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Introduction to Eco-anxiety
In this course, students are expected to learn basic knowledge about eco-anxiety primarily arising from climate change and global warming, and how to treat it. Furthermore, actions related to climate change are addressed.
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Lesson: What is Eco-Anxiety
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Eco-anxiety is not considered a disease, at least not yet, but the heightened concern about the climate emergency we are experiencing can lead to psychological disorders. The American Psychology Association (APA) describes eco-anxiety as “the chronic fear of environmental cataclysm that comes from observing the seemingly irrevocable impact of climate change and the associated concern for one’s future and that of next generations”. The APA, therefore, acknowledges that the internalization of the great environmental problems that affect our planet can have psychological consequences of varying seriousness in some people.

So what are the major environmental problems associated with climate change? We are talking about the proliferation of extreme weather phenomena such as heat waves and fires, cyclones and typhoons, earthquakes and tidal waves, the loss of biodiversity, water stress and water shortages, and rising sea levels, among others.

Although there is no data yet on how much of the population is suffering from this recent condition, experts say that as climate-related problems worsen, more people are likely to experience eco-anxiety. In fact, one of the pioneering reports on the psychological impact of climate change already warned that eco anxiety was growing (Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Implications, and Guidance, APA (2017)).

Eco-anxiety is a new concept, but it is closely linked to the term “solastalgia”, which was mentioned as a term related to the impact of climate change on human well-being in the medical journal Lancet 2015. Solastalgia, which is also not considered a disease, was coined by the Australian philosopher Glenn Albrecht and is defined as a set of psychological disorders that occur in a native population following destructive changes in their territory, whether as a result of human activities or the climate.

Solastalgia, therefore, affects people who have already suffered the consequences of a natural disaster and this is what differentiates it from eco-anxiety. According to a study on survivors of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), people who have suffered a natural disaster are 4% more likely to have a mental illness, in addition to suffering from post-traumatic stress or depression.

Source: Eco-anxiety, Solastalgia and Fear of Climate Change – Iberdrola

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Lesson List
Introduction to Eco-anxiety
In this course, students are expected to learn basic knowledge about eco-anxiety primarily arising from climate change and global warming, and how to treat it. Furthermore, actions related to climate change are addressed.
0/3
This feature has been disabled by the administrator
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